I still can’t believe this is a real thing. 

Paolo Rivera

pulpofiction:

a fanmix for that feeling you get when you read another mix description; characters described in vague terms, girls with power and boys with tragedies; metaphors abound like flowers in a meadow, their petals heavy with rain; i don’t recognize any of these fucking bands

caressmelouis:

when u come home from school and take ur makeup off

image

There is no more confusion about who The Travelers are and what they want: to break a centuries-old witches’ curse so they can finally settle. And if their leader Markos is successful, magic would be destroyed, which could be catastrophic for Bonnie and the other side. But perhaps Bonnie is headed to a new world — and she won’t be alone. “[The finale] definitely establishes new parameters in the environment we’ll be shooting in Season 6,” Paul Wesley teases. “They reset things in a way, and the writers have the ability to now change the circumstances and locations of where the show takes place.”

— Season finale 5x22 scoop (x)

holdmypurse:

Remember when Romney lost the election so somebody created White People Mourning Romney and collected various people crying over Romney’s loss

pussylesqueer:

Kate Upton

twigbookshop:

Orphan Black is back! In between convincing my kith and kin to binge-watch the first season, quick, I’ve put together a recommendation list for the lovers of cons, clones, and cult-classics in your life. 

Pattern Recognition, by William Gibson 

Sci-fi giant William Gibson’s globe-spinning thriller of corporate shenanigans and human quirks. 

Sekret, by Lindsay Smith 

Cold War espionage meets mad science and superpowers when teenaged psychic Yulia is forced into a world where everyone wants something and no one can be trusted. 

Pawn, by Aimee Carter 

Kitty has a chance at wealth and power in her caste-bound society—if she transforms herself into the prime minister’s niece and dives head first into the plots and rebellion that got her killed. 

Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson

All-powerful corporations, virtual katana duels, a sass-mouthed skater chick, Sumerian mythology, movie-watching pirates, and hacking the human brain. 

The Likeness, by Tana French

When a corpse turns up bearing not only Detective Cassie Maddox’s likeness but also an ID matching one of Cassie’s old undercover identities, Cassie agrees to go undercover as the murder victim. Then things get complicated. Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad mysteries are atmospheric, complex, creepy and engrossing. 

White Cat, by Holly Black 

A teenaged grifter with a past gets rapidly in over his head in this genre-bending tale of crime, conspiracy, memory and magic. 

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro 

It bears no resemblance to Orphan Black in tone, structure, style or philosophy, but Never Let Me Go remains one of my favorite explorations of what it means to be human in a world which may or may not recognize you as such. 

ilovelecter:

shout out to the people who ship their ships quietly and happily and can laugh about it and don’t start shit with anybody about it (◡‿◡✿) 

Mystic Falls, Virginia, 1864

mrsrowlings:

inspired by witchorias “human error”

nina dobrev at the cw upfronts 2012/2013

illustratosphere:

Flower girls series by Stasia Burrington

Prints available on Etsy

fohk:

"You have to let me go"

"I can’t!"

Shutter Island (2010)
Martin Scorsese

yn;